Rails Remote Conf

OCT 12-14 2016



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OCT 12-14 2016 11:00-15:30 EST

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Speakers

We've got the best of the best!

Joel Schaubert

Joel Schaubert


Matt Polito

Matt Polito


Marcus Blankenship

Marcus Blankenship


Charles Max Wood

Charles Max Wood


Peter Bhat Harkins

Peter Bhat Harkins


Jason Swett

Jason Swett


Sam Joseph

Sam Joseph


Nathen Harvey

Nathen Harvey


Justin Gordon and Rob Wise

Justin Gordon and Rob Wise


Cameron Dutro

Cameron Dutro


Nell Shamrell

Nell Shamrell


Phil Nash

Phil Nash


Schedule

October
12
12 - 4:30PM EST
October
13
12 - 4:30PM EST
October
14
12 - 4:30PM EST

Your Data is Corrupt

Oct 12, 2016 11:00 AM EST

Almost every Rails database contains records that won't pass their model validations, leading to "can't happen" bugs months or years later. This talk introduces a gem that detects unsafe practices and lurking corrupt data. Come learn to recognize and prevent five ways data becomes corrupt, and maybe replace ActiveRecord validations entirely.

About The Speaker

Peter Bhat Harkins
Peter Bhat Harkins

Peter Bhat Harkins is a senior software developer in Chicago, IL. As a journalist and contractor he has built and maintained dozens of websites, experimenting all the way. He would love to hear about the code you've written or what his talk made you think of - please email him at peter@valent.io.


Rails Concerns code along

Oct 12, 2016 12:00 PM EST

Rails concerns are an excellent introduction to intermediate level Ruby and Rails programming concepts. We'll start from a github clone with a simple application designed to track ice cream inventory and usage at a network of stores. Then we'll add support for CSV import and export to load and dump data on the models. Lastly we'll see how to avoid repeating this code over and over for each Model, View, and Controller by using concerns for models and controller and the proper use of .html_safe to commonalize shared code for the views. This will be a code along talk. We will start from a github pull and modify the code step by step.

About The Speaker

Joel Schaubert
Joel Schaubert

Joel Schaubert is a software consultant & started programming before Microsoft had Windows. After getting degrees in EE from Minnesota and Stanford, he realized software was where all the fun was. Specializing in Rails for Healthcare he most recently finished up five years as a Consulting CTO, designing and leading the creation of the software behind bedwatch.com using Rails, AWS, Twilio, and Mirth. He lives the minimalist life with his wife roaming across America owing nothing but a Honda Element (the Red Tardis) and whatever they can fit inside it.


Hey, Do you even PORO?

Oct 12, 2016 1:30 PM EST

We’ve all heard it, “keep your controllers skinny, put your logic in your models...but not too much...you don’t want your models getting too fat…” I’ll introduce a popular and effective way to deal with complexity in your models by using Plain Old Ruby Objects to refactor a real world model used in a social advertising automation tool. When we’re done, you’ll be able to use this technique to create more elegant and maintainable applications in Rails with real world complexity.

About The Speaker

Michael Kelly
Michael Kelly

Michael Kelly, Lead Web Engineer with Monsieur, is passionate about two things, building MVPs and teaching cool technologies to younger developers. He’s been building Rails applications for over three years now and has over seven years of experience as a software engineer. He tweets a little and is generally just a bad monkey.


React on Rails: Why, What, and How?

Oct 12, 2016 2:30 PM EST

Are you considering integrating React into the front-end stack for your Rails application? Would you like to pass values from your controller right into a React component, possibly with server rendering? You have two main choices in the Rails community. You can use popular react-rails gem which leverages the asset-pipeline. Or you can use the react_on_rails gem which uses webpack and standard JavaScript tooling for the integration. In this talk, we’ll cover the motivations and techniques behind react_on_rails, and why embracing the JavaScript open source standards is the best bet for your Rails project.

About The Speaker

Justin Gordon and Rob Wise
Justin Gordon and Rob Wise

Inspired by the Ruby on Rails Community, Justin began blogging on RailsOnMaui and working on open source. A philosophy of sharing, plus React/Webpack/Rails integration, developed into ShakaCode! A family, coding, and surfing in Maui create a healthy life balance. Find me at http://www.shakacode.com and @railsonmaui.


Open Source Charity Rails Apps For Professional Development

Oct 13, 2016 11:00 AM EST

AgileVentures is a UK based charity that helps groups of developers form teams to work on IT projects for other charities and non-profits. The philosophy is to provide professional development opportunities for software engineers wanting to level up their technical and team skills in the context of real-world projects with real users; while also providing a useful service to deserving causes. The majority of our projects have used Ruby on Rails as a tool for quickly prototyping systems for charities, and this talk focuses on our experiences over the last three years working with the Rails stack, onboarding developers from around the world and maintaining those apps so they continue to deliver value to the end users.

About The Speaker

Sam Joseph
Sam Joseph

I've been mucking about with computers for over 30 years, starting with early attempts to program games in basic on the BBC Micro and ZX Spectrum in the 80s. I studied AstroPhysics, then Cognitive Science and then Computer Science at university, picking up a PhD (building Neural Nets in C and C++) and two masters along the way. I researched mobile agents at Toshiba in Japan (Java) then went freelance for two years (writing tech articles and building the NeuroGrid search engine, and working with the Cerego learning engine - lots of SQL). Then University of Tokyo researching Peer to Peer, and then to University of Hawaii where I was working with collaborative systems and started programming in both PHP and Ruby/Rails. Then I taught Computer Science for Hawaii Pacific University remotely from the UK (Software Engineering, Computer Games programming) for five years, during which time I got involved in MOOCs and started AgileVentures with many of the mentors in this chat room. Then I ran the MakersAcademy coding bootcamp in London for a couple of years, and now I'm full time trying to make AgileVentures a sustainable charity enterprise. I mainly program in Ruby/Rails/JavaScript, and although I get by in CSS/HTML I think my strength is more on the backend with databases, algorithms and dev/ops. Over the years I've done a lot of Machine Learning, Data Analysis, and Scientific studies into learning and development. You can see some of my technical papers here: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=SslTbocAAAAJ&hl=en but I kind of eschew Academia now, wanting to focus on using the Agile methodology and HCI techniques to build things that actually help people.


2FA, WTF?

Oct 13, 2016 12:00 PM EST

Everyone is hacking everything. Everything is vulnerable. Your site, your users, even you. Are you worried about this? You should be! Don't worry, I'm not trying to scare you (that much). We have plenty of safeguards against attempts on our applications' user data. We all (hopefully) recognise Two Factor Auth as one of those safeguards, but what actually goes on under the hood of 2FA? We'll take a look into generating one time passwords in Ruby, implementing 2FA in Rails applications and the only real life compelling use case for QR codes. Together, we'll make the web a more secure place.

About The Speaker

Phil Nash
Phil Nash

Phil is a developer evangelist for Twilio serving developer communities in London and all over the world. He is a Ruby, JavaScript and Swift developer, Google Developer Expert, blogger, speaker and occasionally a brewer. He can be found hanging out at meetups and conferences, playing with new technologies and APIs or writing open source code.


TBD

Oct 13, 2016 1:30 PM EST

TBD

About The Speaker

Charles Max Wood
Charles Max Wood

TBD


Estimates that Don't Suck

Oct 13, 2016 2:30 PM EST

One of the most dreaded questions for an engineer is “What’s the estimate on that? When will it be done?” Too often it feels as if business users treat estimates as set in stone promises that engineers must treat as blood oaths. It is easy for an engineer to throw up his or her hands and proclaim “It will be done when it’s done!” While that may be satisfying, accurate technical estimates are a real need for any business. In order for a business to be successful, it must be able to plan. Estimates feel hopeless because too often we do them wrong. There IS a way to make accurate technical estimates based on qualitative data, rather than gut feeling or guesswork. This talk will present my method for estimating technical projects (whether for development, operations, or both) that has been honed through years of experience as both an engineer and a team lead. You will walk away understanding and knowing how to communicate the difference between an estimate and a deadline, along with recognizing when someone may say one and really mean the other. You will also see a live demo of estimating a real feature piece by piece, step by step, and immediately be able to apply it to your own work. Estimates suck because most of us (engineering or business users alike) simply don’t know how to do them. Come to this talk to find out how.

About The Speaker

Nell Shamrell
Nell Shamrell

TBD


The best programmer I ever worked with

Oct 14, 2016 11:00 AM EST

Great programmers and developers must be more than just great engineers or testers. The best show soft skills and characteristics that can be learned. Empathy: The best programmer I ever worked with cared about the people who used his software, having empathy for them and the environment in which they worked. Awareness of Communication: He understood that software’s design was the primary way we communicated with our users, and he was careful and intentional about what we communicated. Humble: He was virtually egoless, never feeling that some programming tasks or chores were below him. Joyful: Finally, he truly enjoyed his work, finding meaning and purpose in his craft, and he infected his team with his enthusiasm. In this talk I will examine these four characteristics and explain why more developers should aspire to them.

About The Speaker

Marcus Blankenship
Marcus Blankenship

TBD


Angular for Rails Developers

Oct 14, 2016 12:00 PM EST

Building a single-page application with Angular and Rails is not a very straightforward endeavor. How do you structure the application? How do you deploy? How do you do testing? We don’t have time to answer all these questions in depth, but Jason can share with you how to get headed down the right path to make Angular/Rails development as painless as possible.

About The Speaker

Jason Swett
Jason Swett

TBD


Hacking the Asset Pipeline

Oct 14, 2016 1:30 PM EST

Rails defines clear boundaries around your application. It makes easy stuff easy. Unfortunately the convention-over-configuration paradigm we've all come to love can also be dramatically constraining if you want to do something outside the framework's purview. The asset pipeline is a great example of this. It's one of Rails' best features, but also one of its most complicated features. It's difficult to understand, difficult to customize, and has a public interface that is such a moving target the maintainers might as well call it a private interface. Still, the asset pipeline and the Sprockets gem are amazingly cool, and it's hard to find equivalent functionality in other frameworks. This talk will explore how to customize the asset pipeline in a sustainable way. In other words, we'll make customizations that (crossing my fingers) won't break horribly when the next version of Rails comes out.

About The Speaker

Cameron Dutro
Cameron Dutro

Cameron Dutro works on the platform team at Lumos Labs, primarily on their Ruby internationalization infrastructure and lumosity.com, a large Rails application. He's been building stuff in Ruby for the past five years, including the TwitterCLDR internationalization library. His recent struggles with the Rails asset pipeline inspired his talk at this year's Rails Remote Conf.


InSpec: Making Compliance Fun

Oct 14, 2016 2:30 PM EST

Uh oh, it’s time for a compliance audit! You know the drill, keep the auditor on the East-side of the building, make sure you only answer the questions that are asked, and remember, this only happens twice a year. Everyone wants to move faster and ship updates with higher velocity. Regulatory burdens and compliance can add extra drag on the system. Controls that live in notebooks, spreadsheets, and PDF files are difficult to verify. Scanning the production systems for compliance means you find violations when it’s too late and when they’re most expensive to fix. Compliance must be managed as code and must be part of your everyday development process if you’d like to improve compliance and increase velocity. In this talk, we’ll look at one way you can move compliance controls directly into your development process. We’ll explore InSpec, an open-source testing framework for infrastructure with a human- and machine-readable language for specifying compliance, security and policy requirements.

About The Speaker

Nathen Harvey
Nathen Harvey

Nathen Harvey, VP of Community Development at Chef, helps the community whip up an awesome ecosystem built around the Chef platform. Nathen also spends much of his time helping people learn about the practices, processes, and technologies that support DevOps, continuous delivery, and high velocity organizations. Prior to joining Chef, Nathen spent a number of years managing operations and infrastructure for a diverse range of web applications. Nathen is a co-host of the Food Fight Show, a podcast about Chef and DevOps.


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You need to keep learning. One of the most rewarding ways to do that is by attending conferences. Unfortunately, sometimes it's difficult to make it to a conference due to travel costs, the price of the conference ticket, or your ability to take time off.

So, record your favorite primetime TV shows, put on your bunny slippers, and join us for some great Ruby on Rails content.

Or, grab a Users' Group ticket, get a company to provide a projector and pizza, and learn more Ruby on Rails with your closest code buddies.

Rails Remote Conf is a great way to learn from the brightest minds in Ruby on Rails while minimizing these issues. The main benefits of Rails Remote Conf are:

  • Speakers
  • No travel.
  • Low Cost.
  • Watch Anywhere.
  • Users' Group Friendly.

Single Attendee Registration

  • Regular: $200 per attendee through October 12, 2016

Includes access to:

  • Live sessions of Rails Remote Conf.
  • Conference discussion forums and chat rooms.
  • Early access to conference recordings after the conference.

User Group Registration

  • Regular: $2,000 per attendee through October 12, 2016

Includes access to:

  • Live sessions of Rails Remote Conf to one location at a time.
  • Discussion forum.
  • Early recordings access.
  • Includes Chat Room access on the streaming page for support, Q&A, etc.

You can:

  • Give the invitations away or assign them to specific users. We think they'd make great door prizes.
  • Change venues throughout the conference, but may only stream to one location at a time per group registration you purchase.

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