JS Remote Conf

JAN 14-16 2016



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JAN 14-16 2016 11:00-16:30 EDT

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Speakers

We've got the best of the best!

AJ ONeal

AJ ONeal


Derick Bailey

Derick Bailey


Kent C. Dodds

Kent C. Dodds


Aimee Knight

Aimee Knight


Evan You

Evan You


Toran Billups

Toran Billups


John Papa

John Papa


Nik Molnar

Nik Molnar


Mehran Hatami

Mehran Hatami


Elijah Manor

Elijah Manor


Doris Chen

Doris Chen


Samer Buna

Samer Buna


Raul Pino

Raul Pino


Freddy Rangel

Freddy Rangel


Aaron Frost

Aaron Frost


TJ VanToll

TJ VanToll


Schedule

January
14
12 - 4:30PM EST
January
15
12 - 4:30PM EST
January
16
12 - 4:30PM EST

Introducing NativeScript

Jan 14, 2016 11:00 AM EST

NativeScript is an open source JavaScript framework for building native iOS and Android apps. But I know what you're thinking: another way of building apps? What makes NativeScript special? Here are a few cool things: * Direct access to Android and iOS APIs—no plugins required. Want to create a file on Android? Run new java.io.File()—in JavaScript! * Completely native user interfaces with native performance—no web views, no DOM, no HTML. * Supported by Telerik, with commercial tooling and support available. In this session you’ll learn how it all works. Architectures will be explained; apps will be built; and fun will be had by all.

About The Speaker

TJ VanToll
TJ VanToll

TJ VanToll is a front-end developer, author, and a senior developer advocate for Telerik. TJ has over a decade of web development experience, including a few years working on the jQuery team. Nowadays, he spends his time helping web developers build mobile apps through projects like Cordova and NativeScript. TJ is @tjvantoll on Twitter and tjvantoll on GitHub.


A beginner’s guide to ASTs

Jan 14, 2016 12:00 PM EST

The Abstract Syntax Tree. It sounds a lot worse than it is. It’s actually quite simple and enables some powerful tools. BabelJS uses it to transform your code from ES.Next to ES5. ESLint uses it to lint your code. And with a knowledge of how it works, you can extend these and other tools to do some mind bustingly powerful things. Prepare to be amazed by ASTs!

About The Speaker

Kent C. Dodds
Kent C. Dodds

I am Kent C. Dodds. I work at PayPal as the frontend engineer. I host JavaScript Air, a live video broadcast podcast about JavaScript. I’m the author of angular-formly. I’m an Egghead.io instructor. I’m happily married and happily the father of three kids. I like code. I care about craft, design, and architecture. I like to talk about it. Come chat with me :-)


Getting Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

Jan 14, 2016 1:00 PM EST

There's no denying that engineers are in high demand. Bootcamps are popping up everywhere, and while they're churning out highly motivated juniors, often it's seniors that companies are really after. So how do we bridge this gap together? On the surface it often looks like we've 'naturally' developed into our current roles. And, as we progress it's incredibly easy to forget what it was like being new. Rest assured however, for most the journey has been filled with a whole lot of grit, determination, and discipline. In this talk, we'll discuss lessons learned one year after going from a bootcamp grad, to a full time, full stack JavaScript developer. Plan to walk away empowered, and with renewed passion for the incredible industry we're all a part of!

About The Speaker

Aimee Knight
Aimee Knight

Aimee Knight is a former figure skater, and software engineer at SparkPost. Outside of work, she’s a weekly panelist on the JavaScript Jabber and Angular Air podcasts, and co-organizer of CharmCityJS. In her spare time, she’s usually playing with a new library or technology, running along the Baltimore harbor, or trying out the latest flavor of Kombucha. Find her, and her contagious enthusiasm on Twitter @Aimee_Knight!


Outside-In Test Driven Development

Jan 14, 2016 2:30 PM EST

Modern day single page apps incorporate acceptance tests, integration tests, and unit tests but how do you choose what type to write when? Join me for a 45 minute live coding session where I show how to listen for "test friction" as you work test-first from the outside in.

About The Speaker

Toran Billups
Toran Billups

Toran Billups is an independent software consultant with a passion for all things JavaScript. When he isn't writing JavaScript you can find him coaching or speaking about test driven development.


Tracking Real World Web Performance

Jan 14, 2016 3:30 PM EST

Study upon study confirms that web performance has a direct correlation to revenue, operating costs, and search engine ranking. With this in mind, we all want our applications to be faster but how do we know what bottlenecks to focus on? Join Nik Molnar, co-founder of the open source debugging and diagnostics tool Glimpse, to learn how to leverage free and open source tools to capture your application’s live performance data, understand what the metrics mean and focus on the ones you should really care about. This session will cover how to use free services to act as a simple lab for synthetic performance testing and how to get Real User Metrics (RUM) from the very last mile via the instrumentation API’s built into browsers. Nik will also demonstrate techniques to automate the performance feedback loop so you can ensure to always treat “fast as a feature”. This session is suitable for any stakeholder who cares about performance. It is classified as 200 level.

About The Speaker

Nik Molnar
Nik Molnar

Nik Molnar is a Program Manager at Microsoft on the Cross Platform and Open Tooling team where he works on Glimpse, an open source diagnostics and debugging tool he co-founded. Living in AUstin Texas, Nik specializes in web development, performance and community management. He is a frequent speaker at international conferences and on technical podcasts. In his spare time, Nik can be found cooking up a storm in the kitchen, hanging with his wife and working on other open source projects.


Callback Hell, Promises, function generators & yield, ES7 async functions

Jan 15, 2016 11:00 AM EST

This is about the evolution of asynchronous programming in JavaScript and how it has made a serious effect on the evolution of JavaScript as a language to be taken more seriously. There are some specific type of concerns when it comes to async programming which would be brought up in every step, such as: - control flow primitives - Error handling - being able to cache asynchronous operations - and doing parallel operations The whole talk would be based on live coding and showing the evolution of the async operations right inside the code. The examples and live coding in each step goes like this: - Callbacks: A regular Expressjs server with routers and middlewares - Promises: The same Express app transforming callbacks to promises using native Promises in Node 4.0 - Function generators & yield: A Koajs server with the same exact routes and endpoints - ES7 async functions: Using Traceur to the same example to transform async operations to use ES7 async and await It is also worth noting that for each step there would be pre-written code base on github which means I am not going to scaffold out the examples from scratch and the live coding would be on the existing code-base to prevent the talk from being boring. In order to run ES7 features, to show how to set up Traceur, part of the talk also covers build systems and front-end tooling which may sound interesting for JavaScript developers.

About The Speaker

Mehran Hatami
Mehran Hatami

A JavaScript enthusiast with 10 years of experience, all the way from using old-fashioned JavaScript libraries like PrototypeJS and using jQuery from the early days to the latest MV* frameworks. Specialized in advanced JavaScript libraries and frameworks like AngularJS, REACT, Backbone and MarionetteJS. He is also an active code-mentor in codementor.io(fixjs) and codeinstitute.net to share his knowledge and help others with their JavaScript problems.


Eliminate JavaScript Code Smells

Jan 15, 2016 12:00 PM EST

Have you ever written JavaScript that worked and passed Lint, but you didn't feel good about it? Maybe you knew it wasn't optimal, but you didn't yet know a better way to write it. We are going to give that code a name... a "code smell". Your JavaScript may pass standard Lint rules, but that doesn't mean it's Legit. "A code smell is a surface indication that usually corresponds to a deeper problem in the system" --Martin Fowler As you progress in your journey as a developer you will find yourself identifying stinky code, but it takes time and training to combat against these smells. It can also be helpful to have proper tooling in place to detect common smells. Code smells scream to be refactored. We will discuss some existing tools and new rules that will help identify numerous smells in your code. In this session we will look at various code smells and discuss techniques on how we can eliminate and protect against their pungent odors. I will explain the smell, discuss how we can detect it, and identify several ways to deodorize the stench.

About The Speaker

Elijah Manor
Elijah Manor

Elijah Manor is a Christian and a family man. He works at LeanKit (@leankit) as a senior software engineer. He specializes in front-end web development and is a Microsoft ASP.NET MVP, ASPInsider, IE userAgent, and a Pluralsight author. He enjoys blogging at http://elijahmanor.com and tweeting (@elijahmanor) about the things he learns.


Let's Secure (the Browser)

Jan 15, 2016 1:00 PM EST

Back in the age of the dinosaurs you had to make horrific form-based web applications that were pretty much an open invitation for anyone to steal all the credit cards in your database and completely pwn your users. In today's age of enlightenment there are many small and simple techniques and guiding principles that you can use to reduce or eliminate all technical attack vectors against you and your users. Keywords Include: Content Security Policy (CSP), JavaScript Web Tokens (JWT), WebCrypto, Cookies, Proof-of-Secret / Secure Remote Password (SRP)

About The Speaker

AJ ONeal
AJ ONeal

6'5. Technophobe. Trying too hard to bring back the magic of 2012. I'm a web security enthusiast working full-time at Daplie on Cloud, a personal, secure, home server.


Growing Express Architecture: Users, Features and Teams

Jan 15, 2016 2:30 PM EST

With the raw power of the V8 engine and many options for building web apps with Express, it's easy to see why Node + Express are a near ubiquitous combination. But, with the seemingly infinite flexibility of Express and JavaScript, it can be overwhelming to look at a project and not have a sense of how to organize everything it needs. How do you organize routers, for example? How much code belongs in them? Where does business logic live? What happens when the team grows, or you get more users; does that affect code organization? As the number of users, features and developers begins to grow, these questions - and more - become critical. From the file system to keeping routers clean and simple, this session will show you the solutions that have served well in apps of all sizes. You'll see how little it takes to grow a web application with new features, new users and new development team members.

About The Speaker

Derick Bailey
Derick Bailey

Derick Bailey is an developer, entrepreneur, author, speaker and technology leader in central Texas (north of Austin). He's been a professional developer since the late 90’s, and has been writing code since the late 80’s. In his spare time, he gets called a spamming marketer by people on Twitter, and blurts out all of the stupid / funny things he's ever done in his career on his email newsletter.


Angular 2: 8 Fundamentals

Jan 15, 2016 3:30 PM EST

Interested in learning more about how to get started with Angular 2? This session cover the 8 fundamentals of Angular applications including modules, components, templates, metadata, data binding, services, directives, and dependency injection. Along the way we’ll discuss some options you have when building apps, how TypeScript fits in, and have some fun with Q&A.

About The Speaker

John Papa
John Papa

John Papa is a Microsoft Regional Director, MVP, and Google Developer Expert for Angular. He is the author of 100+ articles and 10 books, and can often be found speaking around the world at keynotes and sessions for conferences such as NgConf, Build, TechEd, VSLive and AngleBrackets. John is the host of the popular Adventures in Angular podcast, author of the Angular Style Guide, and of many popular Pluralsight courses.


Desktop WebApps w/ Electron

Jan 16, 2016 11:00 AM EST

Occasionally web developers find themselves in the position of needing to author a desktop app. With Electron you can use your ninja-web-skills to accomplish the task of building a native installable desktop app. In this sessions we will go over some of the basics of building an electron app.

About The Speaker

Aaron Frost
Aaron Frost

Frosty is a Principal Engineer at Domo. His job is to help build and ship powerful and fun-to-use software that is changing the landscape of Business Intelligence. He focuses on JavaScript and the web. Over the past few years, Frosty has spoken at several dozen events, in four different countries. He has keynoted a several awesome JS conferences. Additionally, Frosty is one of the four ng-conf organizers, and helps the Angular team rock the ng-community each year. Reach out to him on twitter: @js_dev


On the GraphQL road to a better future for APIs

Jan 16, 2016 12:00 PM EST

GraphQL is a language-agnostic specification between a client and a server, that enables both of them to communicate to the each other in an efficient way when it comes to data. This talk will highlight the problems with the traditional API endpoints and what GraphQL wants to solve. I'll explain the key concepts of GraphQL and how they are useful in providing clients with flexible responses and avoiding unnecessary extra queries. GraphQL gives the clients more power into what data to ask for, the format and shape of the that data, how much of it to fetch, and more. I'll explain GraphQL queries and mutations, and show examples of how to create and work with a GraphQL server.

About The Speaker

Samer Buna
Samer Buna

Samer is Pluralsight author, and software developer. He lives in Sacramento, CA. Samer is passionate about everything Ruby and JavaScript, and he loves exploring the bleeding edge libraries. He has authored few Pluralsight courses about React.js, and his latest course is about GraphQL and Relay


Progressive JavaScript: Library vs Framework

Jan 16, 2016 1:00 PM EST

We are building more and more web applications as Single-Page Applications, and when we talk about "JavaScript Frameworks" we often assume frameworks need to provide everything you need to build a full-fledged SPA. However, a framework designed that way is often a heavy buy-in, and any knowledge/experience specific to that framework is hardly useful outside of SPA scenarios. These frameworks are also often an overkill for relatively simple use cases. On the other hand, there's the idea of "building your own stack with many micro-libraries". It sounds appealing to developers who want more control and flexibility, but the amount of work needed to pick the right parts and stitch them together can be overwhelming and sometimes simply infeasible for developers not specialized in front-end technologies. There is a balance point between the two extremes. And this is how Vue.js is approaching the problem. Vue.js core provides the essential benefits of the view-layer in large frameworks (data-driven DOM updates and declarative component system) without all the conceptual overhead. You can pick up the basic usage in a matter of hours. It can be used as a drop-in enhancement to any existing page or application. On the other hand, the Vue.js ecosystem provides a curated set of tools and libraries when you need to build something more ambitious. Because these tools and libraries are designed to work with Vue.js core, they are guaranteed to work together smoothly. It is also still extremely flexible if you want to pull in other libraries into the fold. Think of it as a "framework" that can be used progressively to adapt to different use cases. The talk will cover these concepts in more details, and showcase the simplicity of Vue.js core and its power when used as a framework.

About The Speaker

Evan You
Evan You

Evan You is a developer and designer with a strong passion for elegant front-end solutions. He is currently a core developer at Meteor Development Group, and previously spent two years at Google Creative Lab working on experimental UI prototypes. Evan is the author and maintainer of Vue.js, a lightweight and flexible framework for building modern web interfaces.


Lateralus: A distributed relay system in JavaScript

Jan 16, 2016 2:30 PM EST

In today's social networking age, we often spend time posting insignificant life updates. But other times, emergency situations arise – times when you really need to get your message across. In emergencies, however, we face obstacles such as low connectivity, blocked networks, no mobile data plans, or not having a smartphone at all. A solution to this problem is a service/platform that allows users to communicate with their relatives via social networks using SMS or BLE protocols. In other words, the ability to use internet without having direct access to it.

About The Speaker

Raul Pino
Raul Pino

Computer Engineer with 6 years of experience, nowadays a Software Engineer at Axiom Zen, and former Grouponer. Full Stack developer on global scale projects, entrepreneur, and awarded hackathon attendee.


Building Web Sites that Work Everywhere

Jan 16, 2016 3:30 PM EST

How to build web sites that work well across various browsers versions and devices is always challenging for web developers. In the session, you’ll learn the best practices and strategy to develop cross-browser web sites that will work with the existing and future browsers. Tools for interoperability tests, cross-browser fundamentals, and tips and tricks on HTML5, CSS, JavaScript development will be illustrated. Feature detection, CSS prefix, and fallbacks will all be examined in the session. A real life example will be used to demonstrate step by step how to build cross-browser and plug-in-Free experiences. With a couple of simple changes to your sites, you can take advantage of web standards and HTML5 features today without breaking your sites in the future. Expect a lot of demos and code in the session.

About The Speaker

Doris Chen
Doris Chen

Dr. Doris Chen is a Senior Technology Evangelist at Microsoft for the Western region of the United States, specialized in web technologies (HTML5, jQuery, JavaScript, Ajax, and Java). Doris has over 18 years of experience in the software industry working in several open source web tier technologies, Java platform, .NET and distributed computing technologies. She has developed and delivered over 400 keynotes, technical sessions, and trainings worldwide. She speaks at numerous international conferences and user groups including O’Reilly OSCON, Fluent, Dev Nexus, HTML5 Dev Conference, WebVisions, JavaOne, SD Forum, and worldwide User Groups. Doris works very closely to create and foster the open source community around Java, NetBeans, Glassfish, and related technologies. Before joining Microsoft, Doris Chen was a Technology Evangelist at Sun Microsystems. Doris received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in computer engineering, specializing in medical informatics.


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So, record your favorite primetime TV shows, put on your bunny slippers, and join us for some great JavaScript content.

Or, grab a Users' Group ticket, get a company to provide a projector and pizza, and learn more JavaScript with your closest code buddies.

JS Remote Conf is a great way to learn from the brightest minds in JavaScript while minimizing these issues. The main benefits of JS Remote Conf are:

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